Posted by: Adam Deane | 07/08/2010

BPM Quotes of the week

On Process and Service – Michael Rosemann

For the BPM-community, everything seems to be a process (‘process as the ultimate first class citizen’). Thus, there is a high level of scepticism that the service notion can add new insights. In fact, every of the exemplary services mentioned above, could be described as a composition of processes.

On Business Pain Management – Danny Crow

The fact is this BPM is meant to look across Business Processes to find the Business pain, it’s not meant to be an application development framework to deliver Demo Ware or Applications (if you want that go buy an application buy some ERP/CRM). If you buy BPM for apps, you’re just going to do what you’ve done in the past, create application silos.

On Process Automation – Craig Reid

There is often the misguided thinking that by simply automating a process we are optimising that process. After all if we remove the human element we often reduce time and cost, right? And this improves the process, right?…Wrong.

On Changing Procedures – Gary Comerford

So if one of the most procedure driven organisations in the world (NASA) is forced to modify their process and procedure as a result of issues and incidents, does this make you think that you should be looking at things like that too?

On BPM Compliance Standards – Shriyanka Hore

Why this obsession with these compliance standards? Isn’t all this fuss killing the evolution of process improvement? Is scalability and standardization of disparate processes across different organizations and different industries really so essential – especially in the case where the buyer intends enterprise wide licensing?

On BPMN Best Practices – David French

It would be useful for organisations adopting BPMN to be able to point to practice notes. Those “best practices” must be appropriate to the organisation and to the task in hand.

On the Death of Google Wave – Scott Francis

So what does it mean for BPM? Not much. Wave was never really about structured interaction, it was about ad-hoc interaction. Although ad-hoc interaction is important to a good BPM strategy, no one (maybe except for SAP) was really leveraging Wave for this.


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